SansBlogue  
Saturday, April 29, 2006
 
Marking (or grading) diminishing the pain ::

Whatever you call it the process of assessing student work is a pain for teachers, and for students. For teachers there's the hard graft of reading and evaluating and providing sensible comment, which for a big class is a lot of work! For students there is the fear of failure (to match one's own ideas of what one is worth, at least) and the problem of not understanding why one was marked down... Christopher Heard on Higgaion has a post "Grade my rubric" which includes the finely logical flowchart that he uses. It looks really complex, though I suspect that in use it is much simpler than it looks, and I think would work well as a scheme for the more objective grading of an essay-style assignment.

My own approach has been different, NZQA requirements have lead to a grid which tries to identify different levels of achievement for several key qualities that the assignment is meant to be testing. The grade is determined by the mix of columns that I can identify in a student's work. Something like this for an assignment that requires the student to select an article and both present and critique it:


Marking Sheet – Presentation

MB731>

Prophets in Context

Name: Date:

Your work will be marked on the qualities listed in the left column. It should reach the standard listed in one of the next three columns. Five out of five at the "acceptable" level are required for a passing grade. The standards for merit and excellence include those for the lower levels.

If you achieve mainly the “acceptable” column then you will get a grade in the C range (C‑, C or C+). If you achieve mainly in the “merit” column then you will get a grade in the B range, while several in the excellence column with one or two in the merit column will get an A range grade.

Quality

Acceptable

Merit

Excellence

Comment

Exegesis

Presentation attempts to reveal author’s underlying exegesis

Underlying exegesis summarised and presented critically

Critique is appropriate and effective


Contexts

Social context of text related to author’s work

Relationship critically examined

Explanation is clear and comprehensible


Literary features

Literary features discussed in relation to the author’s interpretation.

Author’s position critiqued in the light of these features

Offers alternative interpretation


Critique

Attempts both positive and negative criticism

Critique appropriate to author’s goals

Critique helpful for audience’s approach to subject of criticism


Presentation

Presentation is clear and appropriate

Presentation is well organised and uses language effectively

Presentation engages interest and stimulates further thought


Consistent referencing, appropriate form and contents of bibliography and appropriate use of formal written language are requirements for satisfactory work at this level.



SEARCH Tim's sites
Posts listed by topic
My academic CV



Write to Tim

archives:
January 2004 / February 2004 / March 2004 / May 2004 / June 2004 / July 2004 / August 2004 / September 2004 / October 2004 / November 2004 / December 2004 / January 2005 / February 2005 / March 2005 / April 2005 / May 2005 / June 2005 / July 2005 / August 2005 / September 2005 / October 2005 / November 2005 / December 2005 / January 2006 / February 2006 / March 2006 / April 2006 / May 2006 / June 2006 / July 2006 / August 2006 / September 2006 / October 2006 / November 2006 / December 2006 / January 2007 / February 2007 / March 2007 / April 2007 / May 2007 / June 2007 / July 2007 / August 2007 / September 2007 / October 2007 / November 2007 / December 2007 / January 2008 / February 2008 / March 2008 / April 2008 / May 2008 / June 2008 / July 2008 / August 2008 / September 2008 / October 2008 / November 2008 / December 2008 / January 2009 / February 2009 / March 2009 / April 2009 / May 2009 / June 2009 / July 2009 / August 2009 / September 2009 / October 2009 / November 2009 /

biblical studies blogs:

other theology/church blogs:

x


Powered by Blogger


Technorati Profile

Yellow Pages for Auckland, New Zealand