SansBlogue  
Thursday, October 23, 2008
  The "book" of the future
The IFbook blog is often stimulating, send one of the contributors to India, and give them a massive tome on 60 Years of Book Publishing in India and you are practically guaranteed that the resulting post a leap into the post-industrial will provide food for thought.

Two extracts, a thought from the BBC and then my comment:
As you might expect, book publishing in India is enormously complex: 80,000 books are published a year by 16,000 different publishers in India's 22 major languages. Translation happens between Indian languages and to and from non-Indian languages. Piracy is a major issue: a number of contributors bemoan the fact that anything published in Bengali is immediately pirated in Bangladesh (and shortly thereafter on sale in the shops of my neighborhood in Queens).
Mohini Rao in one of the articles in the book mentioned above wrote
We are facing the post-literacy problems even before achieving complete literacy. We are coping with the information revolution even as we struggle with pre-industrial problems. . . . According to the report of the committee on TV software, '. . . Electronic media like the radio and TV have the potential of transcending the literacy barrier and therefore also the class barrier.' TV has made it possible for the non-literate masses to have access to information, and consequently, to the fruits of development without first crossing the literacy barrier. People belonging to the pre-industrial era can take a leap into the post-industrial era without passing through the stages through which the West had to pass.
I listen to the (also often stimulating) Digital Planet podcasts (I believe they are also broadcast) from the BBC world service. While in Brazil (another huge and rapidly developing economy and culture) the presenter visited a radio station whose playlists are chosen by listeners.

So, here's my comment in the IFbook blog:

So, the current "book" for many Indians is the TV or VCD (or perhaps DVD) and/or radio.

If India's mobile phone usage is anything like that in neighbouring
Sri Lanka then a medium that combines radio (or TV) broadcast and
mobile phone (adding either reply or two way communication will further
extend this "book"...

BBC World's "Digital Planet" had an interesting (but very short)
item on a radio station in Brazil which allows its listeners to create
the playlist, that strikes me as modeling the future. Talkback 2.0 ;)






What do you think? Is Talkback 2.0 (or something like it) the new "book"?

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